Sweet potato scones

Sweet potatoes – another one of my absolute favourite foods.  In America, we are all about sweet potatoes for Thanksgiving, but I think they should be enjoyed at all times of year.  As scone recipes go, this one is pretty healthy, actually – no cream, low fat milk, and of course adding sweet potatoes to anything really ups the general healthiness content (antioxidants, etc).  I go heavier on the sweet potato and lighter on the oil.  I actually made a half batch – the recipe below makes 12, but I cut it in half, rolled the dough thinner, and still got about 9 (perhaps I cut them a bit smaller than people normally do).  If you make a half recipe it’s a bit tricky since you have to cut the egg in half, but you basically break it and just pour half in (using the other half for another half recipe or throwing it away).  These scones are so good that you may as well make the whole batch anyway.  Also, you could just as easily call them biscuits because they really aren’t sweet and go best with a meat like roasted turkey or chicken…although you could eat them for breakfast too.

Sweet potato scones (adapted from allrecipes.com.au)

Ingredients – full batch listed below will make 12-15

  • 1¾ cups (245 g) plain flour
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • pinch of nutmeg
  • 1 cup (250 g) cooked, mashed orange sweet potato – this is basically 1 medium sweet potato, but feel free to make this a very heaping cup
  • ¼ cup (60 ml) vegetable oil
  • ¼ cup (60 ml) low-fat (1%) milk
  • 1 large egg, lightly beaten
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
Preheat oven to 210 C / 425 F. Stir together the oil, milk, egg, and sugar in a medium bowl, and then add the mashed sweet potato.  Then add the salt, baking powder, nutmeg, and finally the flour, mixing slowly until it becomes a dough that you can handle (add more flour if it doesn’t come together, but it should).

Turn the dough out onto a floured work surface. Pat out to a 2 cm-thick round (mine was thinner, so anything goes really). Cut into rounds with a biscuit cutter, or in my case, the bottom of a glass.  Place rounds on a baking tray about 2.5 cm apart. Gather up remaining dough. Pat into a circle; cut out remaining scones.  Eventually you’ll be left with a little bit which you can artfully shape into a circle for the last one.

Bake until golden, 12 to 15 minutes. Serve warm preferably, although I ate these the next day with leftover turkey and it was one of the best sandwiches I’ve ever had.  See how simple that was?  It only take a paragraph to describe how to make.

IMG_3851Mixing the wet ingredients

IMG_3852Sweet potato all mashed up and ready to add

IMG_3853After the flour is added, the dough comes together very easily.  See the glass on the right that I used as a “biscuit cutter” – you don’t need anything fancy

IMG_3858Ready to go into the oven – you can see the flecks of sweet potato, yum

IMG_3860Finished scones

IMG_3862When broken apart, you should have an incredibly light and fluffy inside.  So good.

For those of you who think making scones might be hard, please disallow yourself of that notion.  They are way easier than bread to make – honestly the dough comes together in under 15 minutes (not including baking time of sweet potato of course – allow extra time for that!).  And who wouldn’t be impressed by a warm scone?  Don’t look for a special occasion to make these – just make sure you have a friend or two to share them with so you don’t eat them all yourself.

Comments
2 Responses to “Sweet potato scones”
  1. Vinny Grette says:

    This looks GREAT! Delicious and nutritious! Must try

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